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Bing Maps

Mapping and Driving Directions


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Published 06/08/2011 and rated Ratingstars4 4 out of 5 stars
by AppAppeal Editor
What can you use the app for?

Bing Maps provides a service that is somewhat like Google Maps. Users can visit the Bing Maps website and search for specific locations. The user is given Wikipedia information as well as tools that allow them to get driving directions, share maps, save maps for later or see nearby resources such as restaurants, pubs, malls and shopping centers. Users can also see longitude and latitude. When viewing a map, the user can click and drag the map in various directions to see beyond the initial viewing area. Bing Maps includes specific filters that show the user current traffic and traffic camera views as well as driving, walking and other transit options for a geographical area. Additional tools give the user a look at gas prices, available parking and a taxi fare calculator.

Bing Maps screenshot
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What is the history and popularity of the app?

Bing Maps is a part of the larger Bing. Bing was created by Microsoft. The search engine was officially announced on May 28th, 2009. The application was intended to give internet users an easy, convenient way to find things on the web. Microsoft chose to brand the search engine differently to avoid confusion with its other application products. Bing Maps was previously known as Live Search Maps.

What are the differences to other apps?

Bing Maps give users a simple way to find places and information about them. The application works a lot like other similar products. Users can search for specific locations and view them on the map. What makes Bing Maps a little different is its many convenient features, such as taxi fare calculators, walking directions and many more.

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How does the web app look and feel to use?

The Bing Maps website presents users with images of blue and white road maps. The site users a very soft color scheme that gives it a gentle feel, with the blue and orange Bing logo in the upper, left hand corner. Along the left hand side, users can see links to each available tool with a row of buttons just below it. The maps are kept relatively simple, with destinations pinpointed in black and roads drawn in varying blue hues. A search tool bar is presented at the very top of the page so users can locate any geographical region.

How does the registration process work?

A new user is not required to register to access Bing Maps. The user can begin searching as soon as they arrive on the website. Those that would like to sign in can do so by clicking the white “Sign In” button found in the upper, right hand corner of the page. Doing so presents a drop down box. The box contains two blue links and logos. The top one invites the user to sign in with their Windows Live login and the bottom option gives users the ability to sign in through Facebook. The user must have one or the other to sign in and access all Bing Map features.

What does it cost to use the application?

Bing Maps provides a helpful service at a good price: free. There are no charges for using this application. This is a good choice considering how many free map applications are already out there. Anyone can visit Bing Maps as often as they like and map out directions, save destinations and learn more about various areas.

Who would you recommend the application to?

Anyone who needs to find a geographical area or landmark can appreciate Bing Maps. The application is ideal for travelers who want to learn more details about the areas they will be visiting or traveling through.

  • Save specific destinations to access later
  • Log in with an existing Facebook or Windows Live account
  • View traffic details and traffic cameras
  • Calculate taxi fare
  • Share destinations found on Bing Maps with others


Bing Maps video

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